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New Year, New Garden

January 2, 2019

Calendar Cover 2019 (2) This is my tenth year of creating Jean’s Garden calendars, featuring photos of my garden, as gifts for family and friends.

As was true in 2018, most of the images in this year’s calendar feature the new front garden that I began creating in 2015 and expect to complete in 2019. (The exceptions in this year’s calendar are the images for February and October.)

As the wider-angle landscape images for July and August show, areas of the garden that were planted in 2015 and 2016 are now looking quite mature.

Creating this year’s calendar posed some new challenges as I adjusted to a new computer and to new photo editing software. I needed extra time to figure out how to edit the images as I wanted and to add text to them where I wanted.

Here, then, are the images featured in the finished project, my 2019 Jean’s Garden calendar. (Click on any image to enlarge it.)

January 2019 February 2019

January

February

March 2019 April 2019

March

April

May 2019 JUne2019

May

June

July 2019 August 2019

July

August

September 2019 October 2019

September

October

November 2019 December 2019

November

December

This year, as in the last several years, I took advantage of the superior image quality provided by Lulu.com to create and print my calendars. Those interested in more information about this calendar can find it here.

6 Comments leave one →
  1. January 2, 2019 8:51 pm

    I’m impressed at just how robust your front garden looks with plants in place only 2-3 years. Most of my own garden seems slower in its development but perhaps I’m simply viewing it through a lens clouded by impatience. Best wishes with the next phase of your ongoing project in 2019, Jean!

    • January 13, 2019 7:21 pm

      Kris, I wonder if my more humid climate allows for greater photosynthesis and therefore faster growth. Since CO2 and water are the two basic ingredients for photosynthesis (besides, of course, sunshine), and since we know that CO2 is in more than abundant supply, it makes sense that the limiting factor is water.

  2. January 6, 2019 4:55 pm

    Nicely at the enjoyable stage, when the plants look that way you imagined they would. As if they have always been there … but lush and happy.

    • January 13, 2019 7:22 pm

      Yes. Lush and happy, but not yet demanding much maintenance. Meanwhile, while I’ve been focusing my energies on this part of the garden, the older flower beds in the back garden have been looking sadder and sadder.

  3. debsgarden permalink
    January 10, 2019 6:54 pm

    What beautiful images. I could not choose my favorite. Together they make a wonderful collage, just as your garden blends colors and textures to work its magic. Happy New Year and best wishes for new and ongoing projects!

    • January 13, 2019 7:24 pm

      Thanks, Deb. I’m looking forward to finishing this front garden project in 2019 and having more time next year to devote to my neglected back garden.

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